Category Archives: The Immune System

Psychoneuroimmunological Pathways: Social Stress & Inflammation

Alexy Grey art

A recent study from researchers at the UCLA Cousin’s Center for Psychoneuroimmunology revealed a connection between brain activity in the regions that respond to stress and anxiety in social situations and inflammatory immune responses. This lends support to the mind-body (psychology-physiology) connection in the exacerbation of diseases like asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and depression. I was excited to blog about these findings because they are relevant to my ongoing research “Life Stress, Social Problem Solving and Asthma”.

Essentially, I am hypothesizing that asthma patients who can more effectively cope with and adapt to stressful life situations will have better control over their asthma and have a better quality of life. The pathways that I suggest in my model are behavioral (i.e. medication adherence, seeking follow-up care, environmental asthma management strategies, etc), psychological (i.e. more effective coping and problem solving results in less anxiety and stress) and biological (i.e. anxiety and stress are associated with changes in immunology/inflammation and airway physiology).

The findings of the UCLA researchers are looking at the biological pathways from a very direct angle; measuring brain activity and inflammation in concert. While these findings are interesting and support the mind-body connection on a new level, there is still something lacking in terms of payback. That is to say, even if we can understand the tendencies and mechanics of the mind-body connection what good will come of it?

Perhaps my training has skewed my perspective but I suggest that the good will come from psychology and the science of health behavior. We can teach people coping skills and encourage them to engage in more adaptive life strategies. This can change their perception of their abilities to cope, changing their experience of stress, improving their disease self-management and, as this study suggests, support balance in the immune system.

Yoga reduces general inflammation

yoga_bio

A newly published study has found that the regular practice of yoga can lower the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood stream. Cytokines are signalling molecules that regulate the various cellular components of inflammation, an immune-based response to threat (physical or psychological). Long-term inflammation contributes to many health conditions including cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, and asthma.

In this study conditions of stress were implemented through tasks such as holding their bare foot in very cold water, or solving increasingly difficult math problems without a calculator. The researchers also found that those who practiced yoga had less dramatic responses (less increase in cytokine activity, less self-reported anxiety and stress) to the stressors.

The results of this study speak to the wide-ranging benefits of yoga, and other relaxation techniques. This study also highlights the fact that we can train ourselves to have less severe reactions to stressors in our lives. Over time these benefits can really add up, resulting in long-term improvements in physical and mental health.

Saturated fats elicit immune response: Chronic inflammation

New research findings published in Cell Metabolism suggest that high saturated fatty acids found in food like sausages, bacon, salami, cakes, cookies, pastries, chocolate and cheese, can cause low level chronic inflammation. The research demonstrates that the inflammation response is due to the fact that saturated fatty acids are also found in the cell membrane of bacteria. The immune system is treating fatty foods as if it is a foreign/harmful bacteria. Essentially, overeating foods high in saturated fat is on par with having a constant low-grade bacterial infection.

Not only do saturated fats clog arteries, add to body weight in fat and increase the risk of developing diabetes, but they also elicit chronic inflammation (which exacerbates nearly all medical conditions). Unfortunately, “America Runs on Dunkin”…